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Virtuous Woman Inc
Jun 20, 2021
In Community Awareness
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Despite the stigma PTSD does not only impact soldiers whose been in combat. It is a disorder in which a person has difficulty recovering after experiencing or witnessing a terrifying event. The condition may last months or years, with triggers that can bring back memories of the trauma accompanied by intense emotional and physical reactions. Exposure to actual or threatened death, serious injury, or sexual violence in one of the following ways: · Directly experiencing the traumatic event. · Witnessing the event as it occurred to others. · Learning of the traumatic event that has occurred to a family member or close friend that has been violent or accidental. · Experiencing repeated or extreme exposure to aversive details of the traumatic event Presence of one or more of the following intrusive symptoms associated with trauma, beginning after that traumatic event has occurred: · Recurrent, involuntary, and intrusive distressing memories of the trauma · Recurrent distressing dreams related to the traumatic event · Dissociative reactions (flashbacks) where the individual feels or acts as though the trauma was recurring. · Intense or prolonged psychological distress at exposure to internal or external cures that symbolize or resemble trauma Persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with trauma, beginning after that trauma has occurred, as evidenced by one or both of the following: · Avoidance of or efforts to avoid distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings about or closely related associated with trauma · Avoidance of or efforts to avoid external reminders (people, places, conversations, activities, objects, situations) that arouse distressing memories, thoughts, or feelings, about or closely associated with trauma Negative alterations in cognitions and mood associated with the trauma, beginning or worsening after the trauma, as evidenced by two or more of the following: · Inability to remember important aspects of the trauma, due to dissociative amnesia and not other factors such as head injury, alcohol, or drugs. · Persistent and exaggerated negative beliefs or expectations about oneself, others, or the world · Persistent distorted cognitions about the cause or consequences of the trauma that leads to individuals blaming themselves and others · Persistent negative emotional state (fear, anger, guilt, horror, or shame) · Diminished interest or participation in significant activities · Feelings of detachment or estrangement from others · Persistent inability to experience positive emotions (happiness, satisfaction, or loving feelings) Marked alterations in arousal and reactivity associated with trauma, beginning or worsening after the trauma has occurred, as evidenced by two or more of the following: · Irritable behavior or angry outburst, typically expressed as verbal or physical aggression toward people or objects · Reckless or self-destructive behavior · Hypervigilance · Exaggerated startle response · Problems with concentration · Sleep disturbances (difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep, restless sleep) · Duration of the disturbance more than 1 month · Disturbance causes clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or important areas of functioning. · Disturbance not attributable to physiological effects of substance use or another medical condition #PTSDAwarenessMonth #mentalhealth #mentalhealthawareness #mentalhealthmatters
National Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Awareness Month content media
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Apr 03, 2019
In Autism Awareness Month
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex developmental disability; signs typically appear during early childhood and affect a person’s ability to communicate, and interact with others . ASD is defined by a certain set of behaviors and is a “spectrum condition” that affects individuals differently and to varying degrees. There is no known single cause of autism, but increased awareness and early diagnosis/intervention and access to appropriate services/supports lead to significantly improved outcomes. Some of the behaviors associated with autism include delayed learning of language; difficulty making eye contact or holding a conversation; difficulty with executive functioning, which relates to reasoning and planning; narrow, intense interests; poor motor skills’ and sensory sensitivities. Again, a person on the spectrum might follow many of these behaviors or just a few, or many others besides. The diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder is applied based on analysis of all behaviors and their severity. Early Signs of Autism: Autism is treatable. Individuals with autism do not “outgrow” autism, but studies show that early diagnosis and intervention lead to significantly improved outcomes. Little or no eye contact Persistent fixation on parts of objects Lack of or delay in spoken language Repetitive use of language and/or motor mannerisms (e.g., hand-flapping, twirling objects) Lack of spontaneous or make-believe play Lack of interest in peer relationships References https://www.autismspeaks.org/what-autism
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Feb 25, 2019
In African American History
First African American female to be admitted into the astronaut training program and fly into space in 1987. Dr. Mae C. Jemison was born October 17, 1956 to Charlie & Dorothy Jemison, in Decatur, Alabama, but considers Chicago, Illinois, to be her hometown. Graduated from Morgan Park High School, Chicago, Illinois, in 1973; received a bachelor of science degree in chemical engineering (and fulfilled the requirements for a B.A. in African and Afro-American Studies) from Stanford University in 1977, and a doctorate degree in medicine from Cornell University in 1981. Member, American Chemical Society, Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Space Explorers. Honorary Member, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. Board Member, World Sickle Cell Foundation, American Express Geography Competition. Honorary Board Member, Center for the Prevention of Childhood Malnutrition. Clinical Teaching Associate, University of Texas Medical Center. National Achievement Scholarship (1973-1977); Stanford representative to Carifesta '76 in Jamaica; 1979 CIBA Award for Student Involvement; American Medical Student Association (AMSA) study group to Cuba; grant from International Travelers Institute for health studies in rural Kenya (1979); organized New York city-wide health and law fair for National Student Medical Association (1979); worked refugee camp in Thailand (1980). Recipient of Essence Award (1988), and Gamma Sigma Gamma Woman of the Year (1989). Honorary Doctorate of Sciences, Lincoln College, Pennsylvania (1991). Honorary Doctorate of Letters, Winston Salem College, North Carolina (1991). DuSable Museum Award (1992). The Mae C. Jemison Academy, an alternate public school established in 1992 in Detroit, Michigan. Montgomery Fellow 1993 Dartmouth College. Dr. Jemison has a background in both engineering and medical research. She has worked in the areas of computer programming, printed wiring board materials, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, computer magnetic disc production, and reproductive biology. Dr. Jemison completed her internship at Los Angeles County/USC Medical Center in July 1982 and worked as a General Practitioner with INA/Ross Loos Medical Group in Los Angeles until December 1982. Dr. Jemison was selected for the astronaut program in June 1987. Her technical assignments since then have included: launch support activities at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida; verification of Shuttle computer software in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL); Science Support Group activities. Dr. Jemison was the science mission specialist on STS-47 Spacelab-J (September 12-20, 1992). STS-47 was a cooperative mission between the United States and Japan. The eight-day mission was accomplished in 127 orbits of the Earth, and included 44 Japanese and U.S. life science and materials processing experiments. Dr. Jemison was a co-investigator on the bone cell research experiment flown on the mission. The Endeavour and her crew launched from and returned to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In completing her first space flight, Dr. Jemison logged 190 hours, 30 minutes, 23 seconds in space. Dr. Jemison left NASA in March 1993. Jemison also developed and participated in research projects on the Hepatitis B vaccine and rabies. References Administration, N. A. (1993, March). National Aeronautics and Space Administration: MAE C. JEMISON (M.D.). Retrieved February 25, 2019, from National Aeronautics and Space Administration: https://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/jemison-mc.html
Dr. Mae C. Jemison- Former Astronaut  content media
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Feb 25, 2019
In African American History
Florida A&M Professor to Make History Twice Born in Rochester, New York and raised in Tallahassee, Florida, she understood very early on that when things don’t go as planned, you must adjust and continue to fight for what you want. Well, Tracy Thomas, who flunked out of pharmacy school while an undergraduate student at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU), used her failure to make history. She is an alumni of FAMU and member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated. On August 5, 1994, Thomas earned her physical therapy degree, and two months later, she received her license to practice. Not to mention, she only had to take her board exams one time, which is extremely difficult for most. On August 8, 2008 at 39 years old, Thomas received her Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences with an emphasis in cardiovascular pharmacology and toxicology, becoming one of only five physical therapists in the United States with a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences. In 2014, she returned to Florida A&M University as the director of physical therapy research and a physical therapy professor. Thomas’ failure pushed her into a career that has allowed her to make history twice, and not to mention she has no student loans, and makes enough money to pay for her Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) Clinical Doctorate degree. In May 2019, at 50 years old, Thomas will earn her Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) Clinical Doctorate degree, making her the only African-American with both a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences and DPT in the nation. References OGUNSOLA, J. (2018, September 04). How Failure Led This Florida A&M University Professor To Make History, Twice. Essence Magazine. Retrieved January 2, 2019, from https://www.essence.com/lifestyle/goforit/how-failure-led-this-florida-am-university-professor-to-make-history-twice/
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Feb 25, 2019
In Prenatal Awareness Issues
If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, there are steps that can be taken to protect your fetus or newborn from infections that cause serious health problems. There are four specific infections to be aware of as an expectant mother below: Cytomegalovirus- in the United States, 1 out of every 200 babies are born with congenital CMV infection. CMV is a virus passed from the mother to the baby during pregnancy. It is usually passed from those who are infected via bodily fluids such as (semen, vaginal fluids, saliva, urine, and blood). Women can reduce the risk of passing CMV to children by minimizing the contact with urine and saliva from babies and young children and by practicing hand hygiene. Group B strep- Group B Strep is a bacteria that can cause babies to become very sick or even die when passed from the mothers. According to the CDC, about 1 in 4 women in the United States carry the bacteria that causes the group B strep disease. You can prevent passing the disease to your baby during pregnancy by being tested and treated with an antibiotic if positive. Testing is important between 35-37 weeks of pregnancy and if your water breaks or you go into labor prior to being tested, advise your midwife or doctor. Listeriosis- a rare but serious infection caused by eating food contaminated with bacteria called listeria. Listeria usually impacts individuals with weakened immune systems, elderly, newborns, and pregnant women. Pregnant women are 10 times more likely to acquire the disease and about 1 in 6 cases of listeriosis have been linked to pregnancy according to the CDC. Pregnant women usually experience flu-like symtoms such as fever, fatigue, muscle aches, and infections can often lead to miscarriage, stillbirth, premature birth, and life threatening infections for the newborn. Pregnant Hispanic women are 24 times likely to acquire the infection according to research. Prevention for listeriosis can be maintained by avoiding the following: Avoid eating cheese made from raw (unpasteurized) milk. Avoid raw (unpasteurized) milk and products made from it, such as cheese, ice cream, and yogurt. Do not eat raw or lightly cooked sprouts of any kind (including alfalfa, clover, radish, and mung bean sprouts). Eat cut melon right away or refrigerate it at 40° F or colder and for no more than 7 days. Throw away cut melons left at room temperature for more than 4 hours. Avoid eating hot dogs, lunch meats, cold cuts, other deli meats (such as bologna), or fermented or dry sausages unless they are heated to an internal temperature of 165°F or until steaming hot just before serving. Do not eat refrigerated pâté or meat spreads from a deli or meat counter or from the refrigerated section of a store. Do not eat refrigerated smoked seafood unless it is in a cooked dish, such as a casserole, or unless it is canned or shelf-stable. Zika virus- infection can be passed from the mother to her baby during pregnancy or around the time of birth. Zika is primarily spread through the bite of an infected Aedes species and via sex to their partners by someone infected with Zika. During pregnancy it can cause birth defects such as microcephaly, eye defects, impaired growth, hearing loss, miscarriage, and stillbirth. Prevention includes the following Avoid traveling to areas where Zika virus is a risk. If traveling to one of the areas is necessary, speak to a physician concerning mosquito bite prevention. Avoid having unprotected sexual encounters, avoid sharing sexual toys, vaginal, anal, and oral sex without proper protection. References Prevntion, C. f. (2018, June 18). Center for Disease Control & Prevntion. Retrieved from National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases: https://www.cdc.gov/features/prenatalinfections/index.html
Prenatal Infection Prevention Awareness: "Preventing Infections During Pregnancy" content media
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Feb 09, 2019
In Community Awareness
Teen Dating Violence is defined as the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional aggression within a dating relationship, including stalking. It can occur in person or electronically and might occur between a current or former dating partner. Several different words are used to describe teen dating violence. Below are just a few: • Relationship abuse • Intimate partner violence • Relationship violence • Dating abuse • Domestic abuse • Domestic violence Teens often think some behaviors, like teasing and name-calling, are a “normal” part of a relationship. However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence. The 2017 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey found that 8 percent of high school students reported physical violence and 7 percent reported that they experienced sexual violence from a dating partner in the 12 months before the survey. A CDC Report found among victims of contact sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, about 26% of females and nearly 15% of males first experienced some form of violence by that partner before age 18. Unhealthy, abusive, or violent relationships can have short- and long-term negative effects on a developing teen. Additionally, youth who are victims of dating violence in high school are at higher risk for victimization during college. Youth who experience dating violence are more likely to: • Experience symptoms of depression and anxiety • Engage in unhealthy behaviors, such as using tobacco, drugs, and alcohol • Exhibit antisocial behaviors • Think about suicide Violence is related to certain risk factors. The risk of having unhealthy relationships increases for teens who: • Believe that dating violence is acceptable • Are depressed, anxious, or have other symptoms of trauma • Display aggression towards peers or display other aggressive behaviors • Use drugs or illegal substances • Engage in early sexual activity and have multiple sexual partners • Have a friend involved in teen dating violence • Have conflicts with a partner • Witness or experience violence in the home Dating violence can be prevented when teens, families, organizations, and communities work together to implement effective prevention strategies.
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Feb 09, 2019
In American Heart Awareness
A heart attack occurs when the flow of blood to the heart is blocked. The blockage is most often a buildup of fat, cholesterol and other substances, which form a plaque in the arteries that feed the heart (coronary arteries). The plaque eventually breaks away and forms a clot. The interrupted blood flow can damage or destroy part of the heart muscle. A heart attack, also called a myocardial infarction, can be fatal, but treatment has improved dramatically over the years. It's crucial to call 911 or emergency medical help if you think you might be having a heart attack. Not all people who have heart attacks have the same symptoms or have the same severity of symptoms. Some people have mild pain; others have more severe pain. Some heart attacks strike suddenly, but many people have warning signs and symptoms hours, days or weeks in advance. The earliest warning might be recurrent chest pain or pressure (angina) that's triggered by exertion and relieved by rest. Angina is caused by a temporary decrease in blood flow to the heart. Women are more likely than men to have heart attack symptoms unrelated to chest pain, such as: •Neck, jaw, shoulder, upper back or abdominal discomfort. •Shortness of breath. •Pain in one or both arms. •Nausea or vomiting. •Sweating. • or dizziness. •Unusual fatigue. Symptoms include: • Pressure, tightness, pain, or a squeezing or aching sensation in your chest or arms that may spread to your neck, jaw or back • Nausea, indigestion, heartburn or abdominal pain • Shortness of breath • Cold sweat • Fatigue • Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness Risk factors include: Age, hypertension, smoking, obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, family history, lack of physical activity, stress, illicit drug use, autoimmune condition, and high blood cholesterol or triglyceride levels. If you suspect a heart attack: Call for emergency help Take an aspirin or if prescribed by a physician nitroglycerin Prevention: Heart attacks can be prevented if you take prescribes medication as directed Maintain a healthy weight Maintain a healthy lifestyle
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Feb 09, 2019
In African American History
From talk show host and business entrepreneur to actor and philanthropist, there is little the "Queen of All Media" hasn't done and dominated throughout her career. Oprah Winfrey has broken several records throughout her career. Oprah Winfrey is a media mogul who helmed one of the most popular TV shows in U.S. history. She used her platform to do everything from launching her own production company, Harpo (her name spelled backwards), to starting a school for girls in Africa. Winfrey is the first black woman billionaire, with deep attention paid to strategic financial partnerships and enterprises. Her immense monetary wealth aside, Winfrey has spent her career fostering creative projects that have elevated her standing as an American icon among fans. In the mid-1970s, Winfrey became the first black woman to anchor a nightly news program in Nashville at the age of 19 while in college. A decade later, she became the host of A.M. Chicago, directly competing with the popular Phil Donahue Show. In 1999, Winfrey began to withhold her name for consideration after receiving a lifetime achievement award. Winfrey created her own foundation in 1997 and started a school in South Africa, the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls. The idea for the boarding school, which housed girls from grades 8-12, was inspired by Winfrey's rough childhood. She has openly discussed being a survivor of sexual abuse when she was a child and lobbied for the creation of the National Child Protection Act, which was signed into law by President Bill Clinton in December 1993.  In 1996, Oprah launched Oprah’s Book Club, which selected a literary title for viewers to read and discuss each month. Two years later, in 1998, Winfrey invested in the Oxygen network, a cable channel geared toward women. And in 2000, Oprah debuted O, The Oprah Magazine, featuring a celebration of life, lifestyle, spirituality, arts and culture. Winfrey has appeared on the cover more than 200 times. On January 1, 2011, Winfrey launched the Oprah Winfrey Network, a cable TV platform that featured reality TV shows, dramas and classic series. In 2018, Oprah became the first black woman to win the Golden Globes’ Cecil B. DeMille Award. Her wildly popular Golden Globes speech honored women who had shared their stories of sexual harassment and declared that “a new day is on the horizon.”
Oprah Winfrey- Philanthropists, Media Mogul, Actress, & Talk Show Host content media
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Feb 09, 2019
In African American History
Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama is a lawyer, writer, and the wife of the 44th President, Barack Obama. She was the first African-American First Lady of the United States. Through her four main initiatives, she has become a role model for women and an advocate for healthy families, service members and their families, higher education, and international adolescent girls education. A product of Chicago public schools, Michelle Robinson studied sociology and African-American studies at Princeton University. After graduating from Harvard Law School in 1988, she joined the Chicago law firm Sidley & Austin, where she later met Barack Obama, the man who would become the love of her life. After a few years, Mrs. Obama decided her true calling was working with people to serve their communities and their neighbors. She served as assistant commissioner of planning and development in Chicago’s City Hall before becoming the founding executive director of the Chicago chapter of Public Allies, an AmeriCorps program that prepares youth for public service. In 1996, Mrs. Obama joined the University of Chicago with a vision of bringing campus and community together. As Associate Dean of Student Services, she developed the university’s first community service program, and under her leadership as Vice President of Community and External Affairs for the University of Chicago Medical Center, volunteerism skyrocketed. In 2010, she launched Let’s Move!, bringing together community leaders, educators, medical professionals, parents, and others in a nationwide effort to address the challenge of childhood obesity. Let’s Move! had an ambitious goal: to solve the epidemic of childhood obesity within a generation. In 2011, Mrs. Obama and Dr. Jill Biden came together to launch Joining Forces, a nationwide initiative calling all Americans to rally around service members, veterans, and their families and support them through wellness, education, and employment opportunities In 2014, Mrs. Obama launched the Reach Higher Initiative, an effort to inspire young people across America to take charge of their future by completing their education past high school, whether at a professional training program, a community college, or a four-year college or university. Reach Higher aimed to ensure that all students understood what they need to complete their education by working to expose students to college and career opportunities; helping them understand financial aid eligibility; encouraging academic planning and summer learning opportunities; and supporting high school counselors who do essential work to help students get into college. In 2015, Mrs. Obama joined President Obama to launch Let Girls Learn, a U.S. government-wide initiative to help girls around the world go to school and stay in school. As part of this effort, Mrs. Obama called on countries across the globe to help educate and empower young women, and she shared the stories and struggles of these young women with young people here at home to inspire them to commit to their own education.
Michelle Obama- Attorney & Community Advocate content media
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Feb 09, 2019
In African American History
First woman president of Liberia, November 2005, and Africa's first female elected head of state. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, née Ellen Johnson, (born October 29, 1938, Monrovia, Liberia), Liberian politician and economist who was presidentof Liberia (2006–18). She was the first woman to be elected head of state of an African country. Johnson Sirleaf was one of three recipients, along with Leymah Gbowee and Tawakkul Karmān, of the 2011 Nobel Prize for Peace for their efforts to further women’s rights. Johnson Sirleaf is of mixed Gola and German heritage. Her father was the first indigenous Liberian to sit in the national legislature. She was educated at the College of West Africa in Monrovia and at age 17 married James Sirleaf (they were later divorced). In 1961 Johnson Sirleaf went to the United States to study economics and business administration. After obtaining a master’s degree (1971) in public administration from Harvard University, she entered government service in Liberia. Johnson Sirleaf served as assistant minister of finance (1972–73) under Pres. William Tolbert and as finance minister (1980–85) in Samuel K. Doe’s military dictatorship. She became known for her personal financial integrity and clashed with both heads of state. During Doe’s regime she was imprisoned twice and narrowly avoided execution. In the 1985 national election she campaigned for a seat in the Senate and openly criticized the military government, which led to her arrest and a 10-year prison sentence. She was released after a short time and allowed to leave the country. In recognition of Johnson Sirleaf’s leadership of Liberia during the challenging period of transition after the country’s devastating years of conflict and for the positive changes that took place in Liberia under her administration, in February 2018 she was awarded the 2017 Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership. The award provided $5 million, disbursed over 10 years, followed by an annual $200,000 stipend for the rest of Johnson Sirleaf’s life. It also brought the possibility of the foundation awarding $200,000 annually over the course of 10 years to charitable causes supported by Johnson Sirleaf.
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Feb 03, 2019
In African American History
Mary Violet Leontyne Price was born on February 10, 1927, in Laurel, Mississippi, to James Anthony Price, a carpenter, and Kate Baker Price, a midwife with a beautiful singing voice. Price showed an interest in music from a young age and was encouraged by her parents. After beginning formal music training at age 5, she spent much of her time singing in the choir at St. Paul Methodist Church in her hometown. Renowned for her early stage and television work, Price made her opera stage debut at the San Francisco Opera in 1957, and her debut at New York City's Metropolitan Opera House in 1961. One of the first African-American singers to earn international acclaim in the field, Price became known for her roles in Il Trovatore, Antony and Cleopatra and Aida, before retiring from the opera in 1985. Soprano Leontyne Price became one of the first internationally recognized African-American opera stars. Price became one of the first African-American singers to gain an international reputation in opera, and as such she enjoyed the luxury of being selective with her roles throughout the 1970s. She chose to perform in opera productions less frequently during that period, focusing mainly on recitals. In September 1964, the then 37-year-old Price was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Lyndon B. Johnson. Two decades later, in 1985, she became a National Medal of Arts recipient. Throughout her career, Price's recordings earned her numerous honors, including more than a dozen Grammy Awards.  Leontyne Price established an impressive legacy, achieving stardom as a woman of color during a time of segregation in America and in a profession where limited opportunities existed for someone with her background.
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Feb 03, 2019
In African American History
Marguerite Annie Johnson Angelou (April 4, 1928 to May 28, 2014), known as Maya Angelou, was an American author, actress, screenwriter, dancer, poet and civil rights activist best known for her 1969 memoir, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, which made literary history as the first nonfiction best-seller by an African-American woman. Angelou received several honors throughout her career, including two NAACP Image Awards in the outstanding literary work (nonfiction) category, in 2005 and 2009.  Maya Angelou became the first black female streetcar conductor in San Francisco, California, in the 1940s. Maya Angelou's 1969 autobiography, I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, is the first nonfiction best-seller by an African-American woman. Maya Angelou is the first African-American woman to have her screenplay produced, for the 1972 film Georgia, Georgia. Maya Angelou was lauded in 1995 for her record-setting, two-year run on The New York Times' paperback nonfiction best-seller list. Maya Angelou recited one of her poems at President Bill Clinton's 1993 inaugural ceremony marking the first inaugural recitation since 1961.
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Feb 03, 2019
In American Heart Awareness
Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease. Heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions. 1 in 3 adults in the United States has high blood cholesterol, a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. High blood cholesterol can be hard to detect, as it often shows no signs or symptoms. Encourage families to make small changes, like using spices to season their food instead of salt.Motivate teachers and administrators to make physical activity a part of the school day. This can help students start good habits early.Ask doctors and nurses to be leaders in their communities by speaking out about ways to prevent heart disease. Join the American Heart Association’s national movement in support of healthier communities and healthier lives.
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Jan 11, 2019
In Cancer Awareness
Many different cancer-related awareness campaigns occur throughout the year and not all of them are coordinated by the American Cancer Society. There are over 30 types of cancer awareness colors. An estimated two-thirds of all cancers are preventable. According to the National Cancer Institute, cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Information and education are key to cancer prevention, early detection and to sound decision making about treatment options. The CIS is the National Cancer Institute's link to the public, interpreting and explaining research findings in a clear and understandable manner, and providing personalized responses to specific questions about cancer. Access the CIS by: Calling 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237). Accessing the NCI’s Smoking Quitline at 1–877-44U-QUITNCI’s Cancer Information Service visit their website National Cancer Institute’s website .
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Jan 11, 2019
In Cervical Cancer Awareness
What is cervical cancer? Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. Cancer is always named for the part of the body where it starts, even if it spreads to other body parts later. When cancer starts in the cervix, it is called cervical cancer. The cervix is the lower, narrow end of the uterus. The cervix connects the vagina (the birth canal) to the upper part of the uterus. The uterus (or womb) is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. Cervical cancer is the easiest gynecologic cancer to prevent with regular screening tests and follow-up. It also is highly curable when found and treated early. All women are at risk for cervical cancer. It occurs most often in women over age 30. Each year, approximately 12,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer. The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV is a common virus that is passed from one person to another during sex. Most sexually active people will have HPV at some point in their lives, but few women will get cervical cancer. What are the symptoms? Early on, cervical cancer may not cause signs and symptoms. Advanced cervical cancer may cause bleeding or discharge from the vagina that is not normal for you, such as bleeding after sex. If you have any of these signs, see your doctor. They may be caused by something other than cancer, but the only way to know is to see your doctor. Are there tests that can prevent cervical cancer or find it early? There are two tests that can either help prevent cervical cancer or find it early: • T he Pap test (or Pap smear) looks for pre-cancers, cell changes, on the cervix that can be treated, so that cervical cancer is prevented. The Pap test also can find cervical cancer early, when treatment is most effective. The Pap test is recommended for women aged 21-65 years old. T he Pap test only screens for cervical cancer. It does not screen for any other gynecologic cancer. • T he HPV test looks for HPV— the virus that can cause precancerous cell changes and cervical cancer. When should I get tested for cervical cancer? The Pap test is one of the most reliable and effective cancer screening tests available. You should start getting regular Pap tests at age 21. If your Pap test results are normal, your doctor may say that you will not need another Pap test for three years. The HPV test can be used to screen for cervical cancer along with the Pap test in women aged 30 years and older. It also is used to provide more information when women aged 21 years and older have unclear Pap test results. If you are age 30 or older, you may choose to have an HPV test along with the Pap test. If the results are normal, your chance of getting cervical cancer in the next few years is very low. Your doctor may then say that you can wait up to five years for your next screening. For women aged 21-65, it is important to continue getting a Pap test as directed by your doctor—even if you think you are too old to have a child or are not having sex anymore. However, your doctor may tell you that you do not need to have a Pap test if either of these is true for you: • You are older than 65 and have had normal Pap test results for several years. • You have had your cervix removed as part of a total hysterectomy for non-cancerous conditions, like fibroids.
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Jan 09, 2019
In General Discussions
Feel free to discuss any issues you would like to become more aware of in this platform as we join the mission of awareness in our communities.
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Virtuous Woman Inc
Jan 09, 2019
In Community Awareness
Sex trafficking is a crime when women, men and/or children are forcefully involved in commercial sex acts. In the United States, any minor under the age of 18 engaged in commercial sex acts is automatically considered a victim of sex trafficking under the law. Worldwide, it's estimated that there are 4.5 million victims of sex trafficking. International Definition: Sex trafficking is the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring or receipt of persons who under threat, force, coercion, fraud, deception or abuse of power are sexually exploited for the financial gain of another. US Definition: United States, sex trafficking involves three elements: the process, the means and the goal. The U.S. Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act defines sex trafficking as the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision or obtaining of an individual who under force, fraud or coercion is induced to perform a commercial sex act. Note that sex trafficking does not have to have some form of travel, transportation or movement across borders. At the core, sex trafficking is characterized by sexual exploitation through force, fraud or coercion. For children (anyone under 18 years old), consent is irrelevant, and the element of means (e.g., force) is not necessary (22 USC §7102). Trafficking via Internet: Traffickers utilize social media, dating sites and online advertisements to market minors and trafficked victims. Ads seemingly posted by a person willingly engaged in the sex trade are often created or monitored by traffickers. Traffickers lie about the victim’s age and may even disguise themselves as the person in the ad when communicating with johns via the internet or phone. Some websites try to screen ads for trafficking; however, the sheer volume of ads makes this process a daunting task.
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